My #DayofDH Storified

I’d hoped to get one more post in on how I use digital humanities in my own research, but it’s 7:00 p.m. It can wait until next year.

Instead, I’ve storified my #DayofDH to sum it all up. (I apparently can’t embed it in wordpress.com, so you’ll have to click through!)

I’ve also storified some other favorites here.

Until next year, #DayofDH friends! Phambili!

DH_poster_image-640x842

 

Wikidot and Workshop Planning

I am on the program committee of the North Eastern Workshop on Southern Africa (NEWSA), an interdisciplinary gathering of scholars  who work on southern Africa. The workshop meets every 18 months and our eleventh gathering is coming up in October 2014! The workshop is coordinated by a program committee that solicits abstracts and organizes panels while a local arrangements committee makes sure…local arrangements… are in order. All of these committee members are spread out around the globe and most of our organizing takes places via email. Perhaps the most intensive work surrounds the acceptance and organization of papers and panels. The abstracts came in last month, so now the committee turns its attention to vetting them over the next few weeks. (Thus, I’m working on it this afternoon and sharing my experience with #DayofDH.) Enter Wikidot. I am new to the committee and also new to Wikidot. But Wikidot has been easy to learn and the advantages countless, particularly since an earlier committee member set up our Wikidot with easy to use instructions. newsa instructions Someone from the committee uploads all of the paper and panel abstracts to Wikidot. Wikidot allows us to tag them with themes and start thinking about possible panel organization from the get-go. Fullscreen capture 482014 20839 PM.bmp Then others from the committee log-in and review, using +/- buttons to rate them and the comment feature to share more in-depth opinions. It allows us all to work on our own schedules while meeting our own deadline to get them reviewed. It is a great tool for collaboration, organization, and decision making.

Lecture Prep and Digital Humanities

Some portion of my Tuesday is usually devoted to grading and lecture prep for the rest of the week. Tomorrow the Modern Africa History course will cover decolonization in Portuguese Africa, so I want to blog about some of the great online digital sources and tools I use in this lecture.

The African Activist Archive (hosted by our #DayofDH2014 sponsor, MATRIX) has an awesome collection of posters on Angola and Guinea Bissau.

Angola for the Angolans

by Ato Seitu,Toronto Support Committee for MPLA
Montreal, Canada. No date, apparently late 1975 or early 1976

by Chicago Committee for the Liberation of Angola Mozambique and Guinea-Bissau Chicago, Illinois, United States Fall 1973

by Chicago Committee for the Liberation of Angola Mozambique and Guinea-Bissau
Chicago, Illinois, United States
Fall 1973

The posters do not just operate as colorful background to the lecture. They serve as a tool for students to identify and discuss several important themes I hope to cover:

1) The role of international activists, here a U.S. campaign to boycott Gulf. Portugal received significant income from Gulf’s exploitation of Angolan oil that helped pay for its military activities in Angola against the struggle for independence.

by Pan-African Liberation Committee Brookline, Massachusetts, United States. Most likely late 1972 or 1973

by Pan-African Liberation Committee
Brookline, Massachusetts, United States. Most likely late 1972 or 1973

2) The role of women in the struggle for independence. Both the poster above and the items below portray female freedom fighters, allowing us to examine women at war. But students also discuss the decision to feature mothers and their children in these activist materials.

big32-131-3E6-98-LSM Angola 83

by Liberation Support Movement Information Center
Richmond, Canada. 1973

button

by Chicago Committee for the Liberation of Angola Mozambique and Guinea
Chicago, Illinois, United States. No date, 1972?

3) The context of the Cold War. Both the button and poster below provide entry into the discussion of U.S. support for UNITA in one of the Cold War proxy wars.

London, United Kingdom 1993 Publisher: Mozambique Angola Committee

London, United Kingdom
1993
Publisher: Mozambique Angola Committee

by Young Socialist Alliance United States 1976 or later

by Young Socialist Alliance
United States
1976 or later

Finally, I use the Schomberg Center for Research in Black Culture’s Africana Age page for photographs of important leaders to accompany our discussion.

Agostinho Neto. UN photo from the Schomberg Center.

Agostinho Neto. UN photo from the Schomberg Center.

What other great digital sources do you use in lecture?

Kicking off #DayofDH 2014

How does a Digital Humanist and Twitterstorian kick off her #DayofDH? And most days, really?

IMG_5859

Tea and Twitter. This morning, with some assistance from the cat.

In addition to Twitter, I check South Africa’s Mail & GuardianDaily Maverick, and the blog Africa is A Country (which Peter Alegi, another of our #DayofDH participants, blogged about here).

And usually the “This Day in History” feature at South African History Online (SAHO)… when something catches my eye, I’ll tweet about it with related sources available online.

Then, the day starts.